Sustainability of Hemp

by Honnah Ogbechie on March 09, 2018


Ever wonder where the nickname “weed” comes from? The hemp plant grows like one, obviating the need for most pesticides (it is naturally resistant to most pests), herbicides, fungicides and thriving on less water than most crops. Because of its resiliency, it has also been flagged as a natural way to clean up soil pollution. Using a process called phyto-remediation, hemp was used at Chernobyl to harmlessly extract toxins and pollutants from the soil and groundwater. Hemp actually absorbs CO2 while it grows through natural photosynthesis, making it carbon-negative from the get-go.

 

Hemp has also been used as a fabric since time immemorial. As a textile, hemp is durable, comes in a variety of natural colours based on how it is processed from the plant, and has “a wonderful drape, comparable to linen,” according to Patagonia. Plus, it needs approximately half as much land and half as much water as cotton does to thrive.

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